Tick Occurrence Maps

fleatickmap

Ticks live in all 50 states, although the breeds and the diseases they carry will vary by region. Below are maps showing tick occurrences in the contiguous 48 states, and a brief description of each tick. All information provided by Center for Disease Control and Prevention

American Dog Tick The highest risk of being bitten occurs during spring and summer. Dog ticks are sometimes called wood ticks. Adult females are most likely to bite humans.

Blacklegged Tick The greatest risk of being bitten exists in the spring, summer, and fall. However, adults may be out searching for a host any time winter temperatures are above freezing. Stages most likely to bite humans are nymphs and adult females.

Brown Dog Tick Dogs are the primary host for the brown dog tick in each of its life stages, but the tick may also bite humans or other mammals.

Gulf Coast Tick Larvae and nymphs feed on birds and small rodents, while adult ticks feed on deer and other wildlife. Adult ticks have been associated with transmission of R. parkeri to humans.

Lone Star Tick A very aggressive tick that bites humans. The adult female is distinguished by a white dot or “lone star” on her back. Lone star tick saliva can be irritating; redness and discomfort at a bite site does not necessarily indicate an infection. The nymph and adult females most frequently bite humans and transmit disease.

Rocky Mountain Wood Tick Adult ticks feed primarily on large mammals. Larvae and nymphs feed on small rodents. Adult ticks are primarily associated with pathogen transmission to humans.

Western Blacklegged Tick Nymphs often feed on lizards, as well as other small animals. As a result, rates of infection are usually low (~1%) in adults. Stages most likely to bite humans are nymphs and adult females.