Why Are Mosquitoes Attracted To Me?

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If you are a Mosquito Authority client, you know the pleasure of mosquito-free living. When you leave your property, however, you will need to find other ways to protect yourself from mosquitoes. Even if you take precautions, do you still seem to get bitten? Do you feel like mosquitoes target you more than other people you hang out with? It may not be your imagination.

There are some theories – and pretty good evidence – as to why mosquitoes seem to be more attracted to some people, while others regularly escape their bite.

Multiple studies suggest that blood type is a factor. Time magazine reported that “blood type O attracts mosquitoes more than others (A or B).” Unfortunately, that’s not something you can control, but at least it’s a possible reason that mosquitoes seem drawn to some people..

Mosquitoes also seem to be attracted to our breath according to Edward Walker, PhD professor of entomology at Michigan State University. He told Prevention, “Mosquitoes have the unique ability to smell carbon dioxide, which you breath out, and are ‘very elegant’ at sensing things like humidity and moisture which you also exhale.”

Walker also notes that mosquitoes like lactic acid, which is naturally produced through our skin when we sweat. “Mosquitoes happen to have a specialized receptor as a way to sniff lactic acid,” he explains. He also suggests limiting perfumes and colognes as well as any scented skincare products, as they mimic the smell of flowers which attract mosquitoes.

Taking all of the above into consideration, if you are a mosquito magnet, the solution seems to be: hold your breath, don’t sweat, wear white, and avoid the outdoors altogether if you have Type O blood. Not feasible? Not fun? We agree! So instead, you can help deter those annoying pests from attacking you by wearing light-colored clothes and using insect repellent containing DEET.

The good news is, research is ongoing as to why mosquitoes like humans, and hopefully a perfect solution on how to prevent the bites will be available in the future. “There’s a tremendous amount of research being conducted on what compounds and odors people exude that might be attractive to mosquitoes,” Joe Conlon, PhD, technical advisor to the American Mosquito Control Association told WebMD. “Researchers are just beginning to scratch the surface.”